Check out what you can do with the AGD

Fellowship and Mastership


The Fellowship Award merits an FAGD after the DDS in your credentials. This is a way to level up in your dental profession and also gain respect by your peers and clients as it grows your knowledge and experience with 500 hours of CE.

Become a Fellow

Master of the Academy of General Dentistry
The MAGD is the most prestigious award in the Academy of General Dentistry, reaching an elite level among dentists worldwide! The venerable Mastertrack program has been fine tuned to equip the dentist with most everything he needs for skill and confidence.

Become a Master

Advocacy


We are the nation’s #1 advocate for the General Dentist:

We are constantly watching out for the General Dentist’s interests and are active from Washington DC down to the local state governments keeping track of and acting upon legislation that affects your future and well being as a General Dentist.

We look at issues such as: HIPPA, OSHA, ERISA, Evidence based dentistry requirements by the insurance providers, Sedation performed by General Dentists, Mid-level dental providers, Third Party issues, Discrimination by some carriers towards General Dentists for certain procedures.

Discover CAGD Advocacy

Exclusive Magazine Archives

Check our long running print magazine newsletter for General Dentistry News in California!

GP News Archives

Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons
22 hours ago
Since COVID-19 became a household term, stress on multiple levels began to build for almost everyone in the world, and there doesn’t seem to be a release valve. You keep waiting for the news to improve. And, while you know it will, you may also acknowledge that there will always be times in your life when you are overwhelmed with anxiety and unsure of what the future holds or how to proceed.

Use your training. You should always follow professional guidelines. But when there are conflicting reports, which can you believe? You have been trained in evidence-based decision- making and critical thinking. You can reduce your confusion by using that training to sort through the influx of information and determine which reports are most reliable.

Move your body and train your mind. If your nerves are frazzled, you may need to incorporate some new form of physical exercise that helps raise your endorphin levels and builds your physical reserves. Yoga, meditation and professional therapy can help train you to redirect your thoughts from the bad news you’ve been ingesting to a place of calm, and, from there, you can begin to think constructively once more.

Take breaks from news sources. While it’s important to stay informed, when we continually read or hear news that seems particularly bad, we can become overstimulated, further exacerbating our anxieties. Instead, change the channel. Put on some music. Watch reruns of shows from childhood. Do what you need to bring yourself back to a simpler time and to begin to calm your nervous system.

Move your body and train your mind. If your nerves are frazzled, you may need to incorporate some new form of physical exercise that helps raise your endorphin levels and builds your physical reserves. Yoga, meditation and professional therapy can help train you to redirect your thoughts from the bad news you’ve been ingesting to a place of calm, and, from there, you can begin to think constructively once more.

Speak with your advisory team. When you started your career, you built an advisory team of lawyers, accountants, insurance and financial advisers, and consultants versed in the latest Occupational Safety and Health Administration and Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act guidelines. Ask this team to help you devise a viable plan for the foreseeable future.

Empathize and sensitize. If the news is traumatizing to you, chances are strong that your patients and staff are also affected. Increase the frequency of your office meetings to check in with staff and make sure they’re managing their stressors. Listen to the concerns of your patients, and realize that their anxiety levels are most likely through the roof.

Be grateful for what you have. When the news is bad, it’s easy to focus on everything that’s wrong and how it can get worse. Do yourself a favor, and remind yourself daily of all you have that brings you joy, contentment, security and ease.

Remember that this is just a moment in time. Though things could get worse, there is every reason to believe that they will get better.

Agd Impact is a members only newsletter designed to educate, entertain and inspire you.

AGD.org/join-agd
... See MoreSee Less
Since COVID-19 became a household term, stress on multiple levels began to build for almost everyone in the world, and there doesn’t seem to be a release valve. You keep waiting for the news to improve. And, while you know it will, you may also acknowledge that there will always be times in your life when you are overwhelmed with anxiety and unsure of what the future holds or how to proceed.

Use your training. You should always follow professional guidelines. But when there are conflicting reports, which can you believe? You have been trained in evidence-based decision- making and critical thinking. You can reduce your confusion by using that training to sort through the influx of information and determine which reports are most reliable.

Move your body and train your mind. If your nerves are frazzled, you may need to incorporate some new form of physical exercise that helps raise your endorphin levels and builds your physical reserves. Yoga, meditation and professional therapy can help train you to redirect your thoughts from the bad news you’ve been ingesting to a place of calm, and, from there, you can begin to think constructively once more.

Take breaks from news sources. While it’s important to stay informed, when we continually read or hear news that seems particularly bad, we can become overstimulated, further exacerbating our anxieties. Instead, change the channel. Put on some music. Watch reruns of shows from childhood. Do what you need to bring yourself back to a simpler time and to begin to calm your nervous system.

Move your body and train your mind. If your nerves are frazzled, you may need to incorporate some new form of physical exercise that helps raise your endorphin levels and builds your physical reserves. Yoga, meditation and professional therapy can help train you to redirect your thoughts from the bad news you’ve been ingesting to a place of calm, and, from there, you can begin to think constructively once more. 

Speak with your advisory team. When you started your career, you built an advisory team of lawyers, accountants, insurance and financial advisers, and consultants versed in the latest Occupational Safety and Health Administration and Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act guidelines. Ask this team to help you devise a viable plan for the foreseeable future.

Empathize and sensitize. If the news is traumatizing to you, chances are strong that your patients and staff are also affected. Increase the frequency of your office meetings to check in with staff and make sure they’re managing their stressors. Listen to the concerns of your patients, and realize that their anxiety levels are most likely through the roof.

Be grateful for what you have. When the news is bad, it’s easy to focus on everything that’s wrong and how it can get worse. Do yourself a favor, and remind yourself daily of all you have that brings you joy, contentment, security and ease.

Remember that this is just a moment in time. Though things could get worse, there is every reason to believe that they will get better.

Agd Impact is a members only newsletter designed to educate, entertain and inspire you. 

AGD.org/join-agd
Load more
Scroll Up